Green

Dreamtime: Brolga is the name of an amazing dancing bird, which belongs to the crane family. The Brolga’s elaborate dancing performances are partly for their own pleasure and partly a mating ritual. Female brolgas are easily distinguished from their male counterparts by their trumpeting sound while dancing. Aboriginal people have immortalised their graceful steps through dancing. There are numerous Aboriginal legends around this amazing bird.

Brolga was a beautiful girl and was obsessed with dancing. Once a romantic named Shaman, wanted her to be his wife. But brolga refused his proposal straight away. She loved dancing alone -nothing else! Sharman tried to marry Brolga in various ways, but never succeeded. Eventually Sharman convinced the supreme spirit to turn Brolga into smaller shape. Due to this intervention, Brolga became a bird. But, she became an excellent, tireless and elegant dancer, dancing with full devotion, spreading her dance; radiating joy and spontaneity. Her faultless creative expressions have inspired others to learn unique dance ever since.

Nambooka is a well-known designer in the quilting world. Her designs are clear, colourful and very attractive.

Bush Onions and Wild Flowers Green

Dreamtime: In winter, after rains, new flowers become abundant. These become very decorative with bright yellow, pink and lavender colours. Wild bush onions have small bulb like onions, long slender green leaves, like thick blades of grass and have distinct onion smell. The bulbs offer a pungent onion flavour; however, the green tops are milder. These can be eaten raw and is considered an important food for Kimberly Aboriginal people. People gather bush onions by digging in the sand. The best time to gather bush onions is in April/May. Bush onions are also favourite food for native birds, known as Brolgas.

Jane is an experienced Aboriginal designer from the well-known Doolan family in Alice Springs, N.T. Jane skilfully drew bush onions (cyperus bulbosus) and wild flowers in separate garden beds in a beautiful way.

Bush Plum Green

Dreamtime: The Bush Plum is a vital food source for the Aboriginal people and is frequently featured in the Women’s dreaming stories. The fruits are harvested by shaking the trees until they fall to the ground but the fruits, although already quite sweet, need to be soaked in water to soften and plump them for eating.The Bush Plum tree flowers in Spring.

M&S Textiles Australia is the largest manufacturer of Australian Aboriginal
designs printed on good quality 100% cotton fabric. Aboriginal artworks are popular throughout the world and the only living ancient artworks.
Its tradition goes back 50,000 years ago revealed by carbon dating of rock painting, cave painting etc. It is amazing that many of the artists do not have any formal education or training.

Bush Spinifex Green

Dreamtime: Spinifex in a species of grass that is found in wet areas usually on the coasts. The grass is native to Australia and grows about 30cm tall. The roots of spinifex grass are very strong and go quite deep into the earth. The edges of spinifex are sharp and can produce cuts if you grab them forcefully. If you live on the coast you may have seen spinifex grass before, it is the grass that sits on top of the sand dunes at the beach. Spinifex can also be found along the coast of other places like New Zealand and New Caledonia. Spinifex grass is important as it stops sand blowing away. The powerful roots keep the sand in place. Spinifex is often deliberately planted on the front dunes to stop the beaches from eroding (wearing away).

Dreamtime:

Australian Aboriginals are hunters and gatherers. Usually women collect bush food from the forest and men pursue wild animals for food from various places. However, none of them, men or women overdoes anything for hording. They have unwritten traditional law not to spoil the environment. They still maintain this age old social law diligently.

Audrey inherited sweet potato dreaming from her parents. In Aboriginal language Bush Potato is called ?Merne anatye?. Bush Potato is a large plant and there are some cracks around this large plant. They dig for Bush Potato in the cracks around the plant. Then they pull out the big root and cook it in hot earth and eat it. The large potatoes become sweet and soft after cooking and the small bush potatoes are soft.

Audrey M Napanangka being an experienced Aboriginal artist depicted the bush potatoes very vividly and skillfully. Colorful flowering bush potato plants have brightened the artwork. Between the plants women are sitting with coolamon and digging sticks. Bush Potato plants grew surrounding the waterhole represented by concentric circle.

Dreamtime:

Rosemary was born at Utopia (Boundary Bore) in the Northern Territory in 1945. She belongs to the Anmatyerre language group. She learnt to paint with acrylic paints during the summer project sponsored by Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association in 1988-89. Since then she has been a very prolific and brilliant artist. Her paintings are held in many galleries and private collections, both in Australia and overseas. She belongs to the same family of eminent artists as Gloria Petyarre, Kathleen Petyarre and the late Margaret Petyarre. In this work Rosemary depicts the leaves of the pencil yam plant and its seeds, which were once an important food source for the Anmatyerre people of Utopia in Central Australia. There are many Dreaming rituals attached to this plant and homage is paid by the women in their awelye ceremonies. Rosemary has used a combination of white dots to represent seeds and coloured leaves with flowing movement to beautifully depict the leaves of the bush yam moving in the gentle desert breeze.

Dreamtime:

Well-known artist Jeannie Pitjara comes from Utopia, a place about 200km from Alice Springs. As an artist, she has sold many of her artworks to private collectors and art galleries in Australia and overseas. In her signature style of bold colour, Bush Yam is one of her best works, with its strong brush strokes depicting the forest bed.

DANCING FLOWERS GREEN

Dreamtime:

The decorative flowers are gorgeously arranged one after another, as if they are bonded together. This unique decoration was only possible with the skillful and experienced hands of June Smith. Collection of various colors in such a beautiful way as if the flowers are with one’s heart. It is simply stunning. June Smith is a well-known artist in Santa Teresa, Alice Springs. She was born in 1960 in Alice Spring and she studied in Alice Springs. She is the first woman in Santa Teresa to paint on silk.

DANCING SPIRIT GREEN

Dreamtime:

Dancing Spirit represents the sacred dance of ancient aboriginal ancestors since the timeof creation. When dancing, these aboriginal spirits pay their respects to Mother Earth,expressing their love and admiration for the sacred land. M&S Textiles Australia is the largest manufacturer of Australian Aboriginal designs printed on good quality 100% cotton fabric. Aboriginal artworks are popular throughout the world and the only living ancient artworks. Its tradition goes back 50,000 years ago revealed by carbon dating of rock

Dreamtime-Knowledge-by-Trephina-Sultan-Green

Dreamtime:

Born in 1967 in Alice Springs, Trephina grew up with many uncles, aunties and cousins doting on her as a beautiful young Aboriginal girl. She was the only child in her family. Trephina learned to pant at a very young age by sitting and watching uncles, aunties and friends paint. She would then pick up a stick and draw her art in the dirt, with her Mother and Aunty being a big influence in her life.

Trephina went to English speaking school at Alice Springs. Even though English became Trephina;s first language, she was taught Luritja, the language of her family and elders at home. Trephina is a well-known artist and many of her artworks are in private collections. Her works are colourful and detailed. In ‘Dreamtime Knowledge’ she neatly drew numerous things which the forefathers created for future generations. She drew women sitting around waterholes with digging sticks.

“Dreamtime” or “Dreaming” has never been a direct translation of an Aboriginal word. The English language does not have an equivalent to express the complex Aboriginal Spiritual concepts to white people. The Dreaming or ‘The Dreamtime’ indicates a psychic state during which contact is made with the ancestral spirits of that special beginning. Trephine, in this artwork depicted how the knowledge has been passed on from generations ancestors and forefathers, making the young generations knowledgeable and aware of Aboriginal Culture.

FLOWERS IN THE DESERT GREEN

Dreamtime:

Australian Outback is vast and displays a very harsh climate with extreme temperatures and almost no rainfall. Occasionally, when it rains, this deserted land showcases its prominence with the blossom of beautiful flowers. The Aboriginal people of Australia consider this as a blessing and celebrate the blossom of wildflowers, pods, bush beds at their traditional rituals and corroboree (gatherings).
Aboriginal Women decorate themselves with these Wild Flowers, Daisies, Bush Leaves when they gather for dancing, singing, corroboree, storytelling etc. Some of these wildflowers are considered as a representation of their spiritual ancestors in beautiful appearances. With winds and currents, these wildflowers sing, entertain and relax people of the land with their fragrance and angelic view.
Lauren Doolan comes from Santa Terese of Central Australia. She belongs to the Doolan family and speaks Arrernte language. Her dreamings mainly involve Wild Desert Flowers, Dancing Spirits, Spirit People etc.

Dreamtime:

Central Australia is a semi desert area. Rain fall in this area is very rare. Vegetation?s are not plenty. However, after several months of dry weather, sometimes Alice Springs get good rainfall. Suddenly area starts blooming with Australian wild flower almost everywhere. The whole territory gets a new life. Visitors are greeted with amazing array of colors of yellow, purple, red green and much more. Christine is a good artist. She belongs to the famous Doolan family. Her art is bold and neat. Christine captured the Fresh Life after Rain with great imagination and skill full artwork.

Composition: 100% Cotton

Fabric Width: 110 cm

Dreamtime:

Gloria is an excellent artist. Her works are attractive, meaningful and very soothing. Although Central Australia is a desert with little rainfall during the year, it still has trees and desert vegetation of unique varieties. It is the home of the Spinifex grass land, various kinds of desert flowers, animals and many other natural gifts. Little rainfall in summer or winter makes areas happy. You observe colourful flowers laughing in the whole area. It is hard to believe that you are in the desert. Acacia, wild orange, rock, wild passion fruit etc., are laughing to welcome you. Gloria uses the natural gifts for her artwork. She depicts the varieties of bush tucker meticulously.

Composition: 100% Cotton

Fabric Width: 110 cm

Dreamtime:

Tamara May’s artwork is inspired by a story or an event in her life, a significant place, a native animal or someone who touched her heart and left her feeling inspired. Her art is a way of expressing herself and finding the works that don’t always come easily. Tamara is a well-known experienced Aboriginal Artist.

Dreamtime:

Kangaroo paw is sedge like perennial plant noted for their unique bird attracting flowers. The tubular flowers are coated with dense hairs and open at the apex with six claw-like structures for which the flower is popularly known kangaroo paw. The flower stem can grow to over 1.5 meters high with abundant of flowers. The colors of flowers are usually yellow, orange, green and red. Guinea flower is an Australian native plant and some other warmer countries. The plant is variously called guinea flower or snake vine. There are about 150 species of the plant globally, most of which become coated with yellow blooms in spring and summer. The boarded Guinea Flower is an Australian native plan. It is a small shrub with reddish branch lets and hairy buds that bears bright yellow flowers in the spring. The artist very skillfully inter mingled the colors to make a real bold designed fabric for patch workers and quilters.

Composition: 100% Cotton

Fabric Width: 110 cm

Dreamtime:

Karen Bird is a skillful artist from Utopia. Her work is neat and attractive. She depicted the Alura Seed very colorfully. Alura seed is abundant in Utopia, as Wind carries it almost everywhere. In her artwork, Karen depicted change of color of seeds from winter to summer and again from summer to winter. The seeds glow in winter and in summer the flow reduces. The change is shown by Karen very clearly. In Utopia Plum Seeds are abundant and as a result of hand-printed fabric has been getting popularity among the Aboriginal people and others. Alura is a place in Utopia and Lillup is another Aboriginal name for Alura.

ONION DREAMING FOREST GREEN

Dreamtime: Doris Inkamala is a well Known Aboriginal Artist from Alice Spring, N.T. her artwork is excellent. She rearranges small bush onion and floral stems very professionally. Wild bush onions are drawn star-shaped and measure half an inch across. Wild onions are slightly more pungent in than the leaves. The tall stalks grow together in small clumps and sometimes reach up to two feet in height. It is a favoured food for brolgas. However, it is very important to make sure that the plant is identified properly prior to consumption wild onions are pungent when. You eat, you get tears in your eyes if you are not away from it. Doris’s artwork is very professional, and customers love her designs. Her works are bold, colourful and details

PLUM SEEDS GREEN

Dreamtime:

Kathleen Pitjara comes from Utopia, NT. Utopia is about 270 KM north ease of Alice Spring. There are about 2000 Aboriginal people living in Utopia. Kathleen is a fabulous artist. Her dreaming is Bush Plum Seed. Once, in the Dreamtime winds blew from all directions to Utopia, carrying Bush Plum seeds of the ancestral land. The first Bush Plum seeds of the dreaming grew and bore fruits and eventually dropped more seeds. To ensure the continued fruiting of this plant in each season, the Aboriginal people pay homage to the spirit of the bush plum and by painting plum seeds as well as by singing, dancing and storytelling in ceremonies. Aboriginal people also make very tasty bread dough from the paste of Plum Seeds. There is a beautiful Aboriginal story about Bush Plum seeds. When young girls fall in love, she goes to her female relatives and friends for right advice. She usually receives instructions from the them,. The young girl was instructed to weave a belt out of her hair while singing Yilpinji songs imbuing the belt with magic. When the man approaches her, she entices him with the charm, until he comes under the influence of her allure. She reveals the belt as his ardour grows and persuades him to place the belt in her waist. As he does put the belt, he falls under her spell and go off together as a couple. Together they eat Bush Plums and hunt for food.

SPIRIT DREAMING GREEN

Dreamtime:

Indigenous Australians are one among the native people on earth with traditions and customs going back to approx. 50000 years. Their belief system is built on their value & respect towards the land and the dreamtime. Though their dreaming about land changes between different groups, the idea of creation from their ancestors, stays similar; ancestors and forefathers sprang up from underneath the soil as spirits and started building mountains, rivers, waterholes, trees, and light garden for future generations.
These ancestral spirits are considered as the creators and they are part of their day to day life. Aboriginals belief death as a transition to another life, where they consider the spirit taking different form of life after death. Spirits / soul of these ancestral beings are transferred to a different shape such as a tree, river, mountain, garden etc.
Anette Doolan comes from Santa Terese of Central Australia. She belongs to the Doolan family and speaks Arrernte language. Her dreaming’s mainly involve Seven Sisters, Dancing Spirits, Spirit Dreaming etc.

SPIRIT PEOPLE 2 GREEN

Composition: 100% Cotton

Fabric Width: 110 cm

Dreamtime:

According to Aboriginal mythology, before creation time there was nothing in the universe. No light, no human beings or animals, no trees or any vegetation. The soil was soft, one day their forefathers sprung up from underneath the soil. They decided to create the necessary things for future generations. Soon they started creating roads, gardens, trees, etc. They gradually built most of the necessary things for future generations. Two rainbow snakes were guarding their creations when the spirit people were getting tired in the evening.

Spirit people gather together and take rest in the evening. They discuss their works, drink, eat and dance. They make rules for future generations to maintain social harmony. The understanding of aboriginal spirituality is fundamental to maintain social order, respect for elders and maintain peace in the community.

Denise Doolan is a meticulous designer. She has depicted the Spirit People uniquely. They are dancing and meeting others excellently. She created the meeting place excellently by drawing the walking paths, men & women walking in a peaceful gathering.

SPIRITUAL WOMEN GREEN

Dreamtime:

Spiritual Women are an integral part of Aboriginal dreamtime stories. The ancestor spirit came down to the earth in human form and created most of the things that their future generations would need. They created the animals, rocks, waterholes, plants, rivers, mountains and other necessary essentials. During creation time, the spirit women were dancing, singing and entertaining the forefathers in the evening.

The ancestors created the relations between various groups of people, between individuals, their relations with lands, animals and how to preserve the relations. Ancestors taught them how to maintain close harmony with each other. The ancestors disappeared after their creations; they stayed in the sacred sites. For this reason, land is always close to the heart of Aboriginal people. The material value of the land is not what the Aboriginal people think is important. They look at the land as part of the Dreamtime, to be preserved for future generations to appreciate.

Dreamtime:

Audrey Napanangka is a very well-known Artist. Many of her art works have been printed on textile materials by M&S Textiles Australia. She skilfully painted her dreaming; i.e. Water Dreaming. In Desert areas of Australia, it is hard to find water. 90% of water comes from underground. Audrey’s experience in the bush tells her where and how to find drinking water in the waterholes. The long curved lines indicate the movement of water in the area. Dotted lines and smaller circles indicate various soakage’s, broken roads, sands, etc.

Many Aboriginal people live in open areas near the bushes. Water has been their most wanted commodity for living in or around the bush. However, most people living near the bush know how and where to find water. They have good knowledge of waterholes, ponds, river water, billabongs etc.

Aboriginal Ceremonies are generally held near the waterholes.

Composition: 100% Cotton

Fabric Width: 110 cm

Dreamtime:

Bush Tucker is a big part of NT life. Bush Tucker is also called Bush Food and is any food native to Australia used as sustenance by the original inhabitants, the Aboriginal Australians. But it can also describe any native fauna or flora used for culinary or medical purposes, regardless of the continent or culture. Aboriginal Australians have eaten native animals and plant foods for an estimated 60,000 years of human habitation on the Australian Continent. Various traditional methods of processing and cooking are used. Many foods are also baked in the hot campfire coals for several hours in ground ovens.

WOMEN COLLECTING BUSH FOOD GREEN

Composition: 100% Cotton

Fabric Width: 110 cm

Dreamtime:

In Mc Donald range and some other places of Northern Territory women go to collect bush food and fruits. It is abundant around the area. Women collect in the dry season to make the tucker. According to Christine, the fresh bush fruits are tasty and healthy.

Christine Doolan depicted the bush food excellently. She presented the bush food in a very nicely. She presented the wild fruits on Coolamon (food tray). Fruits, insects and porcupine etc. could not escape her sight.

YALKE GREEN BY JUNE SMITH

Dreamtime:

Spectacular views of various creatures such as birds and frogs, and different vegetation can be viewed in the Yalke or wetlands of Australia, both in dry or wet seasons. In the dry season, vast water mass goes back to permanent wetlands, waterholes etc. and become home for waterfowls and many other migratory birds of Australia. In the wet, birds like magpies and geese congregate on the wetland or Yalke. June, with a vibtant color sense, has brilliantly depicted this design with Aboriginal symbols and signs out of her dreamtime story

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