Search Results for: bush food

Onion Dreaming-Forest Green-ODRFG

Onion Dreaming Forest Green by Doris Inkamala

Dreamtime: Doris Inkamala is a well Known Aboriginal Artist from Alice Spring, N.T. her artwork is excellent. She rearranges small bush onion and floral stems very professionally. Wild bush onions are drawn star-shaped and measure half an inch across. Wild onions are slightly more pungent in than the leaves. The tall stalks grow together in small clumps and sometimes reach up to two feet in height. It is a favoured food for brolgas. However, it is very important to make sure that the plant is identified properly prior to consumption wild onions are pungent when. You eat, you get tears in your eyes if you are not away from it. Doris’s artwork is very professional, and customers love her designs. Her works are bold, colourful and details

Onion Dreaming-Copper Blue-ODRCBL

Onion Dreaming Copper Blue by Doris Inkamala

Dreamtime: Doris Inkamala is a well Known Aboriginal Artist from Alice Spring, N.T. her artwork is excellent. She rearranges small bush onion and floral stems very professionally. Wild bush onions are drawn star-shaped and measure half an inch across. Wild onions are slightly more pungent in than the leaves. The tall stalks grow together in small clumps and sometimes reach up to two feet in height. It is a favoured food for brolgas. However, it is very important to make sure that the plant is identified properly prior to consumption wild onions are pungent when. You eat, you get tears in your eyes if you are not away from it. Doris’s artwork is very professional, and customers love her designs. Her works are bold, colourful and details

Onion Dreaming-Black-ODRB

Onion Dreaming Black by Doris Inkamala

Dreamtime: Doris Inkamala is a well Known Aboriginal Artist from Alice Spring, N.T. her artwork is excellent. She rearranges small bush onion and floral stems very professionally. Wild bush onions are drawn star-shaped and measure half an inch across. Wild onions are slightly more pungent in than the leaves. The tall stalks grow together in small clumps and sometimes reach up to two feet in height. It is a favoured food for brolgas. However, it is very important to make sure that the plant is identified properly prior to consumption wild onions are pungent when. You eat, you get tears in your eyes if you are not away from it. Doris’s artwork is very professional, and customers love her designs. Her works are bold, colourful and details

Wild-Flowers-Dreaming-2-Yellow-by-Tanya-Price

Wild Flowers Dreaming 2 Yellow by Tanya Price

Dreamtime: In winter, after rains, new flowers become abundant. These become very decorative with bright yellow, pink and lavender colours. Wild bush onions have small bulb like onions, long slender green leaves, like thick blades of grass and have distinct onion smell. The bulbs offer a pungent onion flavour; however, the green tops are milder. These can be eaten raw and is considered an important food for Kimberly Aboriginal people. People gather bush onions by digging in the sand. The best time to gather bush onions is in April/May. Bush onions are also favourite food for native birds, known as Brolgas.

Jane is an experienced Aboriginal designer from the well-known Doolan family in Alice Springs, N.T. Jane skilfully drew bush onions (cyperus bulbosus) and wild flowers in separate garden beds in a beautiful way.

Wild-Flowers-Dreaming-2-Purple-by-Tanya-Price

Wild Flowers Dreaming 2 Purple by Tanya Price

Dreamtime: In winter, after rains, new flowers become abundant. These become very decorative with bright yellow, pink and lavender colours. Wild bush onions have small bulb like onions, long slender green leaves, like thick blades of grass and have distinct onion smell. The bulbs offer a pungent onion flavour; however, the green tops are milder. These can be eaten raw and is considered an important food for Kimberly Aboriginal people. People gather bush onions by digging in the sand. The best time to gather bush onions is in April/May. Bush onions are also favourite food for native birds, known as Brolgas.

Jane is an experienced Aboriginal designer from the well-known Doolan family in Alice Springs, N.T. Jane skilfully drew bush onions (cyperus bulbosus) and wild flowers in separate garden beds in a beautiful way.

Wild-Flowers-Dreaming-2-by-Tanya-Price

Wild Flowers Dreaming 2 Black by Tanya Price

Dreamtime: In winter, after rains, new flowers become abundant. These become very decorative with bright yellow, pink and lavender colours. Wild bush onions have small bulb like onions, long slender green leaves, like thick blades of grass and have distinct onion smell. The bulbs offer a pungent onion flavour; however, the green tops are milder. These can be eaten raw and is considered an important food for Kimberly Aboriginal people. People gather bush onions by digging in the sand. The best time to gather bush onions is in April/May. Bush onions are also favourite food for native birds, known as Brolgas.

Jane is an experienced Aboriginal designer from the well-known Doolan family in Alice Springs, N.T. Jane skilfully drew bush onions (cyperus bulbosus) and wild flowers in separate garden beds in a beautiful way.

Seven-Sisters-Red-by-Marlene-Doolan.jpg

Seven Sisters Red by Marlene Doolan

Dreamtime:

Australian Aboriginal people tell several stories about seven sisters from the Dreaming Time which is the time of creation of the universe by their ancestors. This story of seven sisters originated from the culture of stars in the Taurus constellation.

There were seven sisters who were all beautiful and elegant. Every man who saw them wished to marry one of the sisters. One day the sisters went into the bush with their digging sticks to gather foods including wood ants, witchetty grubs and honey ants. After a successful expedition, they sat down to enjoy a feast, never imagining that a lonely warrior named Warrumma was hiding close by, watching them. While the sisters were eating, Warrumma took away two of the digging sticks and hid them. All the sisters looked for the two lost sticks in vain but eventually the five sisters who still had their digging sticks sadly left without the two sisters whose sticks had been taken.

Clever Warrumma came out of hiding and firmly grabbed the two sisters by their waists. He promised the girls that he would take good care of them and would marry them. The two girls decided that they would pretend to agree to Warrumma?s plan, while looking out for the opportunity to escape. One day they were asked to cut pine bark to make a fire. As soon as the girls climbed the pine trees, those trees started to grow right up to sky. Warrumma shouted in vain for the girls to come down. But they kept climbing and were soon warmly welcomed to the sky by the five sisters anxiously waiting for them, If you observe constellation carefully you may see the two freed girls as they arrive at their sisters? camp in the sky.

Artist Marlene Doolan is from Santa Teresa in the Northern Territory. In her painting she depicts luminous heavenly bodies suspended in the desert night sky. The Milky Way is represented as clouds of dots of different sizes and major stars are represented as a large dot surrounded by circles.

Seven-Sister-Black-by-Marlene-Doolan.jpg

Seven Sisters Black by Marlene Doolan

Dreamtime:

Australian Aboriginal people tell several stories about seven sisters from the Dreaming Time which is the time of creation of the universe by their ancestors. This story of seven sisters originated from the culture of stars in the Taurus constellation.

There were seven sisters who were all beautiful and elegant. Every man who saw them wished to marry one of the sisters. One day the sisters went into the bush with their digging sticks to gather foods including wood ants, witchetty grubs and honey ants. After a successful expedition, they sat down to enjoy a feast, never imagining that a lonely warrior named Warrumma was hiding close by, watching them. While the sisters were eating, Warrumma took away two of the digging sticks and hid them. All the sisters looked for the two lost sticks in vain but eventually the five sisters who still had their digging sticks sadly left without the two sisters whose sticks had been taken.

Clever Warrumma came out of hiding and firmly grabbed the two sisters by their waists. He promised the girls that he would take good care of them and would marry them. The two girls decided that they would pretend to agree to Warrumma?s plan, while looking out for the opportunity to escape. One day they were asked to cut pine bark to make a fire. As soon as the girls climbed the pine trees, those trees started to grow right up to sky. Warrumma shouted in vain for the girls to come down. But they kept climbing and were soon warmly welcomed to the sky by the five sisters anxiously waiting for them, If you observe constellation carefully you may see the two freed girls as they arrive at their sisters? camp in the sky.

Artist Marlene Doolan is from Santa Teresa in the Northern Territory. In her painting she depicts luminous heavenly bodies suspended in the desert night sky. The Milky Way is represented as clouds of dots of different sizes and major stars are represented as a large dot surrounded by circles.

Gathering-by-the-Creek-Burgundy-by-Janet-Long-Nakamarra-min.png

Gathering by the Creek Burgundy by Janet Long Nakamarra

Dreamtime:

For the Aboriginal People of Australia, their country is more than a place to live. Every mountain, river, waterhole, tree, animal etc. are part of their dreaming. Per the Aboriginal dreaming, it is believed that all these things were created by their ancestors, who live in the five elements of nature viz. air, land, water, sky, and fire. Different countries have different languages so are the traditions and rituals.
Aboriginal people strictly follow an unwritten law of caring for the land, animal, bush etc. of their country, to pass them on to newer generations. Often, a place with rock art, waterhole, and wild bush; is referred as a Creek where the Aboriginal women gather to either find food, fetch water or perform a ceremony or a ritual. The artists engrave their dreamings on mountains and/or rocks as a message to future generations and also to embark their skill.
Janet Long Nakamarra comes from Utopia region of Central Australia. She belongs to the Nakamarra family and speaks Anmatyerre language. Her dreamings mainly involve Fire Dreaming, Underground Water, Sandy Creek etc.

Gathering-by-the-Creek-Brown-by-Janet-Long-Nakamarra-min.png

Gathering by the Creek Brown by Janet Long Nakamarra

Dreamtime:

For the Aboriginal People of Australia, their country is more than a place to live. Every mountain, river, waterhole, tree, animal etc. are part of their dreaming. Per the Aboriginal dreaming, it is believed that all these things were created by their ancestors, who live in the five elements of nature viz. air, land, water, sky, and fire. Different countries have different languages so are the traditions and rituals.
Aboriginal people strictly follow an unwritten law of caring for the land, animal, bush etc. of their country, to pass them on to newer generations. Often, a place with rock art, waterhole, and wild bush; is referred as a Creek where the Aboriginal women gather to either find food, fetch water or perform a ceremony or a ritual. The artists engrave their dreamings on mountains and/or rocks as a message to future generations and also to embark their skill.
Janet Long Nakamarra comes from Utopia region of Central Australia. She belongs to the Nakamarra family and speaks Anmatyerre language. Her dreamings mainly involve Fire Dreaming, Underground Water, Sandy Creek e

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