Search Results for: bush food

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Bush Plum Dreaming Brown by Juliette Nakamarra Morris

Dreamtime:

In Dreamtime, Aboriginal people were mostly hunters and gatherers. Men used to hunt Kangaroos, Wallabies and Birds etc. while women gather food from the bush. In any case, they never disturbed the harmony of the nature by over killing animals or gathering food beyond the requirement. They maintain this old age tradition even now. When plums, tomatoes, oranges and other fruits are available in the bush, people would go to the bush in groups to gather these various fruits. They would sit together in the bush, eat their food and discuss various topics concerning women such as women?s business.

Juliette is an Aboriginal artist from Northern Territory, Australia. She learnt painting from her mother and other relatives. Her Dreaming is Bush Plum and Bush Tucker. The motifs in Juliette?s artworks are very clear, bold and beautiful. She depicted people walking in the bush with footprints, men or women with semi-circles, coolamon (tray to keep food), waterholes (the concentric circles) for drinking water, bush plums and other fruits.

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Bush Plum Black by Polly N Wheeler

Dreamtime:

The Bush Plum is a vital food source for the Aboriginal people and is frequently featured in the Women’s dreaming stories. The fruits are harvested by shaking the trees until they fall to the ground but the fruits, although already quite sweet, need to be soaked in water to soften and plump them for eating.The Bush Plum tree flowers in Spring.

M&S Textiles Australia is the largest manufacturer of Australian Aboriginal
designs printed on good quality 100% cotton fabric. Aboriginal artworks are popular throughout the world and the only living ancient artworks.

Its tradition goes back 50,000 years ago revealed by carbon dating of rock painting, cave painting etc. It is amazing that many of the artists do not have any formal education or training.

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Bush Medicine 2 Brown by Narelle Kitson

Dreamtime:

Aboriginal people of Australia have identified numerous natural remedies for common sicknesses. In every Aboriginal community across Australia, you could find a ‘Medicine Man’ (doctor) and/or a ‘Spiritual Doctor’. While the Spiritual Man heals the ill by identifying the spiritual discord and by performing a traditional ritual to cease the sickness, the Medicine Man offers the right medicinal plant mixed with animal fats, to the person in need. Animal fats aid in dissolving these medicinal herbs inside the body and helps in speedy recovery.

Native herbs are chosen in the process of healing by the Medicine Man. Some of these herbs are easily found but some are seasonal making them hard to acquire. For this and various other reasons, the Medicine Man is also referred to Bush Clinician. A few of these medicinal formulas were also documented. A few of the bush medicines are Sticky hopbush, Beach bean, Mud, Sand etc.

Narelle Kitson comes from Willowra Community of Central Australia. She belongs to Nangarrai family and speaks Warlpiri language. Her dreamings mainly involve Sandhill, Bush Medicine, Bush Food etc.

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Bush Medicine 2 Blue by Narelle Kitson

Dreamtime:

Aboriginal people of Australia have identified numerous natural remedies for common sicknesses. In every Aboriginal community across Australia, you could find a ‘Medicine Man’ (doctor) and/or a ‘Spiritual Doctor’. While the Spiritual Man heals the ill by identifying the spiritual discord and by performing a traditional ritual to cease the sickness, the Medicine Man offers the right medicinal plant mixed with animal fats, to the person in need. Animal fats aid in dissolving these medicinal herbs inside the body and helps in speedy recovery.

Native herbs are chosen in the process of healing by the Medicine Man. Some of these herbs are easily found but some are seasonal making them hard to acquire. For this and various other reasons, the Medicine Man is also referred to Bush Clinician. A few of these medicinal formulas were also documented. A few of the bush medicines are Sticky hopbush, Beach bean, Mud, Sand etc.

Narelle Kitson comes from Willowra Community of Central Australia. She belongs to Nangarrai family and speaks Warlpiri language. Her dreamings mainly involve Sandhill, Bush Medicine, Bush Food etc.

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Bush Medicine 2 Black by Narelle Kitson

Dreamtime:

Aboriginal people of Australia have identified numerous natural remedies for common sicknesses. In every Aboriginal community across Australia, you could find a ‘Medicine Man’ (doctor) and/or a ‘Spiritual Doctor’. While the Spiritual Man heals the ill by identifying the spiritual discord and by performing a traditional ritual to cease the sickness, the Medicine Man offers the right medicinal plant mixed with animal fats, to the person in need. Animal fats aid in dissolving these medicinal herbs inside the body and helps in speedy recovery.

Native herbs are chosen in the process of healing by the Medicine Man. Some of these herbs are easily found but some are seasonal making them hard to acquire. For this and various other reasons, the Medicine Man is also referred to Bush Clinician. A few of these medicinal formulas were also documented. A few of the bush medicines are Sticky hopbush, Beach bean, Mud, Sand etc.

Narelle Kitson comes from Willowra Community of Central Australia. She belongs to Nangarrai family and speaks Warlpiri language. Her dreamings mainly involve Sandhill, Medicine, Bush Food etc.

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Bush Coconut Dreaming Red by Audrey Martin

Dreamtime:

The Bush coconut or bloodwood apple, is an Australian bush tucker food, often eaten by Aborigines of Central Australia. The bush coconut is, in fact, a combination of plant and animal: an adult pores female scale insect, lives in a gall induced on a bloodwood eucalypt. It is in the size of an apple with a rough exterior, a small grub can be found inside after breaking the fruit open and is usually eaten. The white flesh is also eaten.

Audrey Martin Napanangka is a very good artist. She belongs to Yuendumu group of artists. She beautifully depicted the bush coconut plants in a decorative manner. The best time to look for bush onion around April/May to pickup. Audrey Martin Napanangka was born in Yuendumu where bush coconuts grow abundantly.

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Bush Coconut Dreaming Brown by Audrey Martin

Dreamtime:

The Bush coconut or bloodwood apple, is an Australian bush tucker food, often eaten by Aborigines of Central Australia. The bush coconut is, in fact, a combination of plant and animal: an adult pores female scale insect, lives in a gall induced on a bloodwood eucalypt. It is in the size of an apple with a rough exterior, a small grub can be found inside after breaking the fruit open and is usually eaten. The white flesh is also eaten.

Audrey Martin Napanangka is a very good artist. She belongs to Yuendumu group of artists. She beautifully depicted the bush coconut plants in a decorative manner. The best time to look for bush onion around April/May to pickup. Audrey Martin Napanangka was born in Yuendumu where bush coconuts grow abundantly.

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Bush Yam Red by Rosemary Pitjara

Dreamtime:

Rosemary was born at Utopia (Boundary Bore) in the Northern Territory in 1945. She belongs to the Anmatyerre language group. She learnt to paint with acrylic paints during the summer project sponsored by Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association in 1988-89. Since then she has been a very prolific and brilliant artist. Her paintings are held in many galleries and private collections, both in Australia and overseas. She belongs to the same family of eminent artists as Gloria Petyarre, Kathleen Petyarre and the late Margaret Petyarre. In this work Rosemary depicts the leaves of the pencil yam plant and its seeds, which were once an important food source for the Anmatyerre people of Utopia in Central Australia. There are many Dreaming rituals attached to this plant and homage is paid by the women in their awelye ceremonies. Rosemary has used a combination of white dots to represent seeds and coloured leaves with flowing movement to beautifully depict the leaves of the bush yam moving in the gentle desert breeze.

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Bush Yam Green by Rosemary Pitjara

Dreamtime:

Rosemary was born at Utopia (Boundary Bore) in the Northern Territory in 1945. She belongs to the Anmatyerre language group. She learnt to paint with acrylic paints during the summer project sponsored by Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association in 1988-89. Since then she has been a very prolific and brilliant artist. Her paintings are held in many galleries and private collections, both in Australia and overseas. She belongs to the same family of eminent artists as Gloria Petyarre, Kathleen Petyarre and the late Margaret Petyarre. In this work Rosemary depicts the leaves of the pencil yam plant and its seeds, which were once an important food source for the Anmatyerre people of Utopia in Central Australia. There are many Dreaming rituals attached to this plant and homage is paid by the women in their awelye ceremonies. Rosemary has used a combination of white dots to represent seeds and coloured leaves with flowing movement to beautifully depict the leaves of the bush yam moving in the gentle desert breeze.

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Bush Tucker White by June Smith

Dreamtime:

Bush food (referred to as bush tucker in Australia) traditionally refers to any food which is native to Australia and is used as sustenance by the original inhabitants, the Australian Aborigines. For thousands of years Aboriginal people survived living off the land, eating well when food was plentiful & conserving it in times of drought. This food is called bush tucker or bush food, and it’s Australia’s native food.
June Smith is a well-known artist in Santa Teresa, Alice Springs. She was born in 1960 in Alice Spring and she studied in Alice Springs. She is the first woman in Santa Teresa to paint on silk

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