Search Results for: bush food

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Bush Food Dreaming Black by Tanya Price

Dreamtime:

Tanya Price was born in 1972, in Alron, north of Alice Springs, NT. She now lives in Utopia.Tanya speaks both Anmatyerre and Alyawarra Aboriginal languages. She learnt painting from her parents and grandparents. Her Dreaming is Bush Tucker. Tanya uses fine dotting techniques as the background of her artworks. Her designs are precise, vibrant and attractive.

In Bush Food Dreaming, she presents a number of motifs in a clear and neat manner. She depicts a fan fair of foods like Oranges, Bush Plums, Bush Berries, Lemons etc. It is a corroboree where people are happily eating, dancing and discussing various social matters, enjoying their presence.

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Bush Sultana Charcoal by Audrey Napanangka – 100% Polyester

Composition: 100% Polyester

Fabric Width: 150 cm

Weight: 100g/m²

Dreamtime:

Kutjea, or Australian desert raisin (Solanum centrale) is a native to the more arid parts of Australia. Like other “bush tomatoes”, it has been used as a food source by Central Australian Aboriginal groups for millennia.

Like many plants of the Solanum genus, desert raisin is a small bush and has a thorny aspect. It is a fast growing shrub that fruits prolifically the year after fire or good rains. It can also grow back after being dormant as root stock after any drought years. The vitamin C-rich fruit are 1-3 cm in diameter and yellow in colour when fully ripe. They dry on the bush and look like raisins. These fruits have a strong pungent smell of tamarillo and caramel that makes them popular for use in sauces and condiments. They can be obtained either whole or ground, with the ground product (sold as “kutjera powder”) easily added to bread mixes, salads, sauces, cheese dishes, chutneys, stews or mixed into butter.

Merne Akatyerre (Arrenrnte language) means Bush Sultana in the Northern Territory. It is a nutrient fruit. Sultana plants are low prickly shrub with soft green leaves and yellow and purple flower. Some Aboriginal people in Alice Spring together with guests often go out to bush with coolamon and digging sticks to collect bush sultana and other bush foods.

Audrey Martin Napanangka is a very experienced and well-known designer. Bush Sultana is a very popular fabric. Audrey, being a collector and gatherer, often goes to the bush with her friends and relatives and sometimes she accompanies tourists. She loves nature and bush foods.

Bush Plum Green by Polly Wheeler

Bush Plum Green by Polly Wheeler

Dreamtime: The Bush Plum is a vital food source for the Aboriginal people and is frequently featured in the Women’s dreaming stories. The fruits are harvested by shaking the trees until they fall to the ground but the fruits, although already quite sweet, need to be soaked in water to soften and plump them for eating.The Bush Plum tree flowers in Spring.

M&S Textiles Australia is the largest manufacturer of Australian Aboriginal
designs printed on good quality 100% cotton fabric. Aboriginal artworks are popular throughout the world and the only living ancient artworks.
Its tradition goes back 50,000 years ago revealed by carbon dating of rock painting, cave painting etc. It is amazing that many of the artists do not have any formal education or training.

Bush-Plum-Ecru-by-Polly-Wheeler

Bush Plum Ecru by Polly Wheeler

Dreamtime: The Bush Plum is a vital food source for the Aboriginal people and is frequently featured in the Women’s dreaming stories. The fruits are harvested by shaking the trees until they fall to the ground but the fruits, although already quite sweet, need to be soaked in water to soften and plump them for eating.The Bush Plum tree flowers in Spring.

M&S Textiles Australia is the largest manufacturer of Australian Aboriginal
designs printed on good quality 100% cotton fabric. Aboriginal artworks are popular throughout the world and the only living ancient artworks.
Its tradition goes back 50,000 years ago revealed by carbon dating of rock painting, cave painting etc. It is amazing that many of the artists do not have any formal education or training.

Bush-Onions-and-Wild-Flowers-Green-by-Jane-Doolan

Bush Onions and Wild Flowers Green by Jane Doolan

Dreamtime: In winter, after rains, new flowers become abundant. These become very decorative with bright yellow, pink and lavender colours. Wild bush onions have small bulb like onions, long slender green leaves, like thick blades of grass and have distinct onion smell. The bulbs offer a pungent onion flavour; however, the green tops are milder. These can be eaten raw and is considered an important food for Kimberly Aboriginal people. People gather bush onions by digging in the sand. The best time to gather bush onions is in April/May. Bush onions are also favourite food for native birds, known as Brolgas.

Jane is an experienced Aboriginal designer from the well-known Doolan family in Alice Springs, N.T. Jane skilfully drew bush onions (cyperus bulbosus) and wild flowers in separate garden beds in a beautiful way.

Bush-Onions-and-Wild-Flowers-Purple-by-Jane-Doolan

Bush Onions and Wild Flowers Purple by Jane Doolan

Dreamtime: In winter, after rains, new flowers become abundant. These become very decorative with bright yellow, pink and lavender colours. Wild bush onions have small bulb like onions, long slender green leaves, like thick blades of grass and have distinct onion smell. The bulbs offer a pungent onion flavour; however, the green tops are milder. These can be eaten raw and is considered an important food for Kimberly Aboriginal people. People gather bush onions by digging in the sand. The best time to gather bush onions is in April/May. Bush onions are also favourite food for native birds, known as Brolgas.

Jane is an experienced Aboriginal designer from the well-known Doolan family in Alice Springs, N.T. Jane skilfully drew bush onions (cyperus bulbosus) and wild flowers in separate garden beds in a beautiful way.

Bush-Onions-and-Wild-Flowers-Black-by-Jane-Doolan

Bush Onions and Wild Flowers Black by Jane Doolan

Dreamtime: In winter, after rains, new flowers become abundant. These become very decorative with bright yellow, pink and lavender colours. Wild bush onions have small bulb like onions, long slender green leaves, like thick blades of grass and have distinct onion smell. The bulbs offer a pungent onion flavour; however, the green tops are milder. These can be eaten raw and is considered an important food for Kimberly Aboriginal people. People gather bush onions by digging in the sand. The best time to gather bush onions is in April/May. Bush onions are also favourite food for native birds, known as Brolgas.

Jane is an experienced Aboriginal designer from the well-known Doolan family in Alice Springs, N.T. Jane skilfully drew bush onions (cyperus bulbosus) and wild flowers in separate garden beds in a beautiful way.

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Women Gathering Bush Tukcer Green by Bernadine Johnson

Dreamtime:

Bernadine Johnson is well known and experienced Aboriginal artist. She comes from Utopia which is a birthplace for many famous Aboriginal Artists. She now lives with her husband Stephen Pitjara, who is also an established artist, and two children in South Australia. Bernadine’s Language group is Arrernte and her dreaming is Bush Tucker.

The motifs in her works are neat, clear and colourful; and the minute details are wonderful. She depicts semi-circles representing women and concentric circles representing waterholes in this design. The women, after collecting various fruits for their food (tucker), sit around the waterholes with coolamon in front of them and digging stick by their side.

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Women Gathering Bush Tukcer Brown by Bernadine Johnson

Dreamtime:

Bernadine Johnson is well known and experienced Aboriginal artist. She comes from Utopia which is a birthplace for many famous Aboriginal Artists. She now lives with her husband Stephen Pitjara, who is also an established artist, and two children in South Australia. Bernadine’s Language group is Arrernte and her dreaming is Bush Tucker.

The motifs in her works are neat, clear and colourful; and the minute details are wonderful. She depicts semi-circles representing women and concentric circles representing waterholes in this design. The women, after collecting various fruits for their food (tucker), sit around the waterholes with coolamon in front of them and digging stick by their side.

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Wild Bush Honey Ant Brown by Audrey Martin Napanangka

Dreamtime:

Aboriginal women will gather Honey Ants from nests found under Mulga Trees by digging half a meter around the entrance of the tre roots where in general the storer ants reside. Found in central Australia around Alice Springs the ants construct nests in red flat sandy soil under a tree or bush and with the entrance camouflaged amongst dead litter. There are many types of these ants and only a careful eye and skilled tracking will enable Aboriginal women to find them in the hallow trees. Honey Ants are unique in using their own bodies as living storage, but they have more functionality than just storing food. Some store liquids, body fat and water from insect prey brought to them by worker ants. Honey ants can later serve as a food source for their fellow ants when food is otherwise scarce.

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